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HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTES OF COLONIAL CALCUTTA – Scottish Church College

Scottish Church College

Scottish Church college was not established in a day. Rev. Alexander Duff, the first missionary to India from the Church of Scotland, founded “General Assembly's Institution” on 13 July 1830, in Feringhi Kamal Bose’s house, located in upper Chitpore Road, near Jorasanko, with the support of Lord William Bentinck,  the

HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTES OF COLONIAL CALCUTTA – Asutosh College

Asutosh College Building

Asutosh College was the brainchild of the great mathematician, educationist and the then Vice-Chancellor of the University of Calcutta, Sir Ashutosh Mukhopadhyay. History says that, in the year 1915, the General Committee of the South Suburban Group of Schools sought permission from the government to establish a college in South Calcutta,

HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTES OF COLONIAL CALCUTTA – City College

City College - Old Picture

City College was actually a product of the Bengal Renaissance. During that golden period in the nineteenth century, that marked the transition from the medieval to the modern, a group of enlightened Bengali gentlemen like Pandit Shivnath Shastri, Ananda Mohan Bose, Umesh Chandra Dutta, Sir Surendranath Banerjea and others, earnestly

HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTES OF COLONIAL CALCUTTA – Bethune College Calcutta

Bethune College - Old Building

Bethune College owes its origin to John Elliot Drinkwater Bethune (1801-1851), who was born in Ealing, England. John was a brilliant student. He was educated at Westminster School, graduated from Trinity College, and later qualified for the Bar to secure an administrative position in Parliament. He was sent to India in 1848, as

HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTES OF COLONIAL CALCUTTA – St Paul’s Cathedral Mission College

St Paul’s Cathedral Mission College Entrance

Since 1865, St Paul’s Cathedral Mission College, Calcutta has a glorious history of about one hundred and fifty years to its credit. The college is one of the oldest academic institutions of the city. It may be safely asserted that this institution played a significant role in the academic field

HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTES OF COLONIAL CALCUTTA – St. Xavier’s College

St. Xavier’s College

St. Xavier's College, founded in 1860 by the Jesuits, was named after St. Francis Xavier, a Jesuit saint of the 16th century from Basque country, north of Spain. The founder of the school is Fr. Henri Depelchin, who oversaw most of the groundwork, during its early years. It is interesting to note

INSTITUTIONS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION IN COLONIAL CALCUTTA – NRS Medical College & Hospital

nrs-02

Formerly known as Campbell Medical School, Nil Ratan Sirkar Medical College & Hospital is a medical teaching institution and a public hospital, situated very near to Sealdah Railway Station, in the heart of Calcutta. It is popularly known as NRS Hospital or NRS Medical College. The Hospital was not built in a

HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTES OF COLONIAL CALCUTTA – Sanskrit College

Sanskrit College, Calcutta - Old picture

Sanskrit College, founded on the 1st day of January 1824, is one of the oldest educational institutions in the country. It was established during the Governor-Generalship of Lord Amherst, based on a recommendation by HT James Prinsep and Thomas Babington Macaulay among others, at a rented house, situated on 66, Bowbazar Street. Within a short

INSTITUTIONS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION IN COLONIAL CALCUTTA – SSK Medical College & Hospital

SSKM or PG Hospital Kolkata

The damp and humid weather, marshy surroundings and diseases like Malaria, Plague, Black Fever, and Amebiasis, as prevailed in Calcutta in those days, soon turned out to be a death trap for the English people, who arrived from the British Isles seeking their fortune. Time and again they were urging

INSTITUTIONS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION IN COLONIAL CALCUTTA – Presidency College

Presidency College Calcutta main Entrance

In the early days the indigenous primary schools of Bengal used to teach only Bengali, simple Arithmetic and Sanskrit. The ‘tolls’ or the local small schools run by individuals, imparted lessons in advanced Sanskrit grammar and literature, theology, logic and metaphysics. But the enlightened Indians of the period, like Raja Rammohun

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